American Evangelicals Are Already Feeling Pressures of Dissent

Let the games begin.

It’s been two weeks since I wrote an article about a political crisis facing American evangelicals. In the column, which I wrote for The Arc Magazine, I argued that because of the differing opinions on President Donald Trump, and the increased polarization of people across the aisle, a coming fissure was already expanding into a split.

I didn’t expect it to come so soon.

An excerpt from SBC Voices writer Dwight McKissic:

The Prestonwood Baptist Church of Plano, TX, (a Dallas suburb) led by Dr. Jack Graham, a former President of the Southern Baptist Convention, has determined to escrow funds totaling $1 million, that were previously designated for the Cooperative Program—the premier funding mechanism of the Southern Baptist Convention’s agencies— because of positions and policies taken by Dr. Russell Moore, President of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention. Other predominately White Southern Baptist Churches are also threatening to withhold Cooperative Program funds surrounding public positions taken by Russell Moore and the ERLC.

Consequently, the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention has decided to investigate and explore the depths of why some churches aren’t giving and the best way to address the whole matter. They want to keep churches giving to the Cooperative Program while seeking a peaceful solution to the reactions to Russell Moore’s policies and position. Because of the Executive Committee’s approach to resolving this matter comprehensively, inevitably, the investigation will require determining the compatibility of Moore’s statements with the values, beliefs, and convictions of Southern Baptists.

Additionally, the Louisiana Baptist Convention has called for an investigation specifically targeting Dr. Moore. They are hostile toward Dr. Moore and would like to see him gone. Dr. Fred Luter, the first African-American President of the Southern Baptist Convention, who pastors the largest Southern Baptist Convention church in Louisiana, and Pastor David Crosby of First Baptist New Orleans have signed a statement vigorously dissenting to the Louisiana Convention’s call for an investigation of Dr. Moore.

The outcome of this investigation will speak volumes to Black Southern Baptist Convention Churches as to whether or not any church leader or entity head who publically, critically evaluate President Donald Trump will be welcome in the Southern Baptist Convention and eligible to serve in any and all levels of denominational life.

This was a rather long quote, but I think it’s necessary to get a sense of what’s happening. You can read the rest here.

The Southern Baptist Convention is a multi-ethnic denomination. I will give credit where credit is due. However, that being said, what remains to be seen is whether the convention allows for differing political opinions, which was the main point of the article I wrote. Can these denominations — conservative ones that place an emphasis on the gospel and the inerrancy of the Bible — be a home for those dissenting from the direction of the Republican Party?

I’m not very convinced they can, and we are already seeing the repercussions of that. But then again, that was our fault wasn’t it? Or rather, it was our forefathers who sold themselves to the party in exchange for power. In the process, it’s likely that people’s hearts were hardened in the process, and can no longer hear the prophetic call of the gospel.

This SBC situation doesn’t seem to be one that will end well, as far as I can see. Things have spiraled out of control. The Trump administration is participating in a juggling act (with all that Russia, wiretapping, et cetera, et cetera…) that, if pulled off, will be one of the greatest acts on God’s green earth. But then again, that’s what it will be, an act, a reality show. Trump tends to be good with those.

Trump supporters are finding any way to justify him, while Trump detractors are looking for any way to vilify him.

You thought 2016 was a bad year? Get ready for what’s to come.